What are Scottish Brochs?

Brochs are Iron Age towers, unique to Scotland, and found mainly in the North Highlands and Islands. Built between 400 BC and 200 AD, these would have been an awesome sight. Though brochs differed from one to another, they seem to have followed a certain design. They were: double skinned or double walled constructions.

What is a Scottish Broch used for?

The original interpretation of brochs, favoured by nineteenth century antiquarians, was that they were defensive structures, places of refuge for the community and their livestock. They were sometimes regarded as the work of Danes or Picts.

What are Brochs in Scotland?

The Broch is an ancient dwelling, built from as early as 500 B.C (and inhabited until 1000 AD), found only in Scotland. Now, the broch is no wooden hut or primitive structure – the broch was an imposing stone tower, a marvel of the Iron Age, described by some as the pinnacle of prehistoric architecture!

How many Brochs are there in Scotland?

Brochs are huge round thick-walled towers which were built in the Iron Age, 2,000 years ago. In Caithness there are more brochs than anywhere else in Scotland. There are around 200 of these impressive buildings, which are thought to have been a status symbols at the time.

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Who lived in Brochs?

The people who lived here were prosperous farmers in communication with other parts of Scotland. There may have been small squabbles but this was generally a settled society. That said, the Broch of Gurness was tricky to get into. There were two outer gateways to access the settlement.

What does Brach mean in Scottish?

Brack an egg. A curling phrase, given by the directors of the game to those about to play; and means, that they are to strike a stone with their’s, with that force that it would break an egg between them at the point of contact. (

How old are Brochs in Scotland?

Brochs are Iron Age towers, unique to Scotland, and found mainly in the North Highlands and Islands. Built between 400 BC and 200 AD, these would have been an awesome sight. Though brochs differed from one to another, they seem to have followed a certain design.

What does Tuarach mean?

Named for an old broch on the land, Broch Tuarach means “north-facing tower” in Gaelic. Lallybroch, as the estate is known among those who live there, in turn means “lazy tower”.

Why did the Romans stop at Scotland?

Their main concern was to protect Roman Britain from attack. In the 3rd century AD there was more fighting along Hadrian’s Wall. Emperor Septimius Severus had to come to Britain to fight the invading tribes. This was the last major Roman campaign in Scotland.

Why is Scotland called Caledonia?

Etymology. According to Zimmer (2006), Caledonia is derived from the tribal name Caledones (or Calīdones), which he etymologises as “‘possessing hard feet’, alluding to standfastness or endurance”, from the Proto-Celtic roots *kal- “hard” and *φēdo- “foot”.

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What is Gaelic Broch?

Broch. broh, n. the local name applied in the north of Scotland to the ancient dry-built circular castles, known also to the Gaelic-speaking people as duns, and to antiquaries as Pictish towers.

Are there Brochs in England?

It is only to the north and west of Scotland, and predominant on Orkney, Shetland and the Western Isles, where stone was a more readily available building material than timber, that brochs are to be found.

Why is Fraserburgh called the Broch?

Fraserburgh – “The Broch”

One of the biggest town’s in the north-east of Aberdeenshire, the fishing town of Fraserburgh got its name from the Fraser family of Philorth. The name “The Broch”, however, stems from the old Scots word for “fort”.

When was the Scottish Iron Age?

The Iron Age in Scotland began c 700 BC and continued to around AD 500.

Are there Brochs in Ireland?

Some Island Brochs are situated on the small islands of lakes. On the mainland there are, on the other hand, numerous Brochs several miles distant from the sea-shore.

Scottish Brochs and Irish Round Towers.

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